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It seems that Kuykendall and the Weeks Brigade were in full effect last week.  They have been scrambling around, attempting to deflect attention off of Mrs. Weeks and onto others.  For those that are unaware, Assistant Superintendent Jennifer Weeks admitted to having a subordinate employee supply her with prescription drugs, that she was unable to obtain on her own.  These meds are a Class IV controlled substance, and it is illegal to possess or use them without a prescription.  Mrs. Weeks coerced an employee, she considered overweight enough to obtain the pills, to go to the doctor to obtain a prescription for this drug once she was no longer able to obtain a prescription for them.  WHY did she do this?  According to Weeks’s statement, she needed to lose 10 lbs.  Weeks acknowledged she was aware that this was not legal and accepted that.  The employee felt pressured into doing this for Weeks.  After expressing discontent for being pressured to do this, Weeks had the employee and DCR investigated by a Kuykendall church member, who later started an investigation company and was subsequently paid by the school district for his services.This information came to light during the Samsel lawsuit, although it has been widely known by district personnel spanning the district. Jennifer Weeks abused her authority as Assistant Superintendent, violating board policies and state ethics laws as well as Mississippi laws.

Since the Samsel lawsuit has not been settled as of today, there is a strong chance of his lawsuit going to trial.  Many people are hoping this case does make it into the courtroom, so more details can come out in regards to this situation and many others that have been widely condoned and left unpunished.  I am sure the employee that was taken advantage of by Weeks is on the witness list should this case make it to trial.  Fortunately, I also happen to know other district personnel that witnessed at least one of these transactions occur at the county office and during the school day.  I am sure that person can be added to the witness list as well.  While not all details came out in the depositions, most certainly more will be revealed at trial.

In the meantime, I find it completely disturbing and disheartening that no action has been taken.  Teachers have lost their jobs over way less than this.  There seems to be one set of rules for the Kuykendall and Weeks social circle and another set for all others.  We have lost really GREAT educators over the most miniscule incidents, meanwhile the leader of the district (Weeks) seems to be above policy and the law.  What a sad day in education!

Refer to the following information in regards to the laws concerning Class IV controlled substances (which includes Phentermine).

U.S. Department of Justice DEA on illegal drug use and purchasing narcotics online.

http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/consumer_alert.htm

Mississippi Penalties for Illegal Possession of Controlled Substances

Schedule III, IV, or IV substances

Possessing less than 50 grams (or fewer than 100 dosage units) incurs a fine of up to $1,000, up to one year in jail, or both. (Ms. Code Ann. § 41-29-139(c)(3)(A).)

Possessing 50 grams or more, but less than 150 grams (or 100 dosage units or more, but fewer than 500 units) incurs a fine of up to $10,000, at least one (and up to four) years in prison, or both. (Ms. Code Ann. § 41-29-139(c)(3)(B).)

Possessing 150 grams or more, but less than 300 grams (or 500 dosage units or more, but fewer than 1,000 units) incurs a fine of up to $50,000, at least two (and up to eight) years in prison, or both. (Ms. Code Ann. § 41-29-139(c)(3)(C).)

Possessing 300 grams or more, but less than 500 grams (or 1,000 dosage units or more, but fewer than 2,500 units) incurs a fine of up to $250,000, at least four (and up to 16) years in prison, or both. (Ms. Code Ann. § 41-29-139(c)(3)(D).)

Possessing 500 grams or more (or 2,500 or more dosage units) incurs a fine of up to $500,000, at least six (and up to 24) years in prison, or both. (Ms. Code Ann. § 41-29-139(c)(3)(E).)

Phentermine is similar to amphetamines.  It is a Class IV controlled substance.

http://law.justia.com/codes/mississippi/2013/title-41/chapter-29/article-3/section-41-29-139

Mississippi Ethics Laws:  http://www.ethics.state.ms.us/ethics/ethics.nsf/PageSection/A_ethics_laws_laws/$FILE/Ethics%20Laws.htm?OpenElement#s25_4_105

Refer to statutes 25-4-101, 103 and 105.

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